Wormsloe State Historic Site

posted in: GEORGIA, TRAVEL | 0

A visit to Savannah, GA really can’t be considered complete without a visit to Wormsloe State Historic Site. The iconic 1.5 mile drive has over 400 live oak trees, thought to be nearly 400 years old. It is absolutely worth the price of admission just to stand in awe and wonder under these majestic trees, but there is more to Wormsloe than meets the eye!

After passing down the drive, you will arrive at the information and visitor center, where you can learn about the history of the land, from its importance to Native Americans, to its ownership by Noble Jones, one of Georgia’s colonial founders.

After familiarizing yourself with the local history, you can take a short hike into the maritime forest, where you will most likely see the usual cast of characters – including shore birds and fiddler crabs.

One of the more unique finds amongst the coastal pines is the colonial life demonstration area, where they have replica tabby huts and various outbuildings and support structures to give a little peek into what colonial accommodations were like. The tabby house is a far cry from the large sprawling abodes we claim today!

I loved the textures of the woven fencing, made a small, bendable branches. You could see that this same structure was used to apply tabby and create the walls of the structures.

I also found the clapboard roofing to be interesting – also very different from the styles of shingles that we use today, but Im sure that they were innovative and effective at the time.

Wormsloe is a great place to spend an afternoon, and a prettier drive cannot be found, in South Georgia or elsewhere! And rest assured, after working up an appetite in the historic site, you will find good grub in Savannah!

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Hello fellow adventurer! I'm Jessica Jones, or just Jess if you'd like. I'm a driver at Jeeptographer.com, primarily with Magnus, my 2017 Jeep Wrangler. I'm 33 years young, and I enjoy adventuring to beautiful spots with the primary intent of taking photos. I *love* capturing our natural world.

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